When Louise Odes Neaderland was a young woman, she supported herself painting landscapes - a form of labor surely almost nobody could support themselves doing today. She also worked as a carpenter, waitress, electrician and “scoop girl” at an apple turnover factory, to name a few. Following a formative time as a photographer, Neaderland went on to become a prolific printmaker and book artist, as well as the founder and director of the International Society of Copier Artists. A pioneer in her field, she discovered the artistic potential of the copy machine through her photographic work. One day while copying some of her photos, Neaderland found herself creating small folded zine-like books out of the images. The “metaphor” of the copy machine “served [her] purpose; the mindless repetition could be both vehicle and catalyst for the creative statement.” She describes her xenographic work as “what [she] does best, sometimes brilliantly.” Below is a sample of the artist's work in the medium.





As the founder and director of the International Society of Copier Artists, Neaderland supported and worked to highlight the works of her fellow artists. Below is a sample of some of the works she published in the quarterly, copies of which can be found in the SVA Library Periodicals archives and rare editions.


 
The I.C.S.A. Quarterly 5, No. 1 (Fall 1986)
The I.C.S.A. Quarterly 3, No. 4 (Summer 1985)
 
The I.C.S.A. Quarterly 10, No. 4 (Summer 1992)

 
The I.C.S.A. Quarterly 10, No. 4 (Summer 1992)
 
The I.C.S.A. Quarterly 5, No. 1 (Fall 1986)
 
The I.S.C.A. Quarterly 10, No. 4 (Summer 1992)